Me on Sourdough

Apparently, sourdough breadmaking is fashionable and will pass, a project for lockdown some say. Well, maybe it is, but I’m not giving it up once the pandemic is behind us and the lockdowns are lifted. I think I’ll be baking to the end of my days. 

Making sourdough may be a bit of a faff and time-consuming, but with days without end at the moment, it’s an hour-gobbling pursuit that leaves you with a tasty and moreish loaf at the end. Sourdough bread is healthier than standard commercial bread, containing no additives, just water, flour and a starter – also made from water and flour. Some gluten intolerant people say they can eat sourdough without any adverse reactions because it’s additive free.

I became addicted to sourdough about four years ago when I was given as a present a one-day course at E5 Bakehouse in East London, an artisan bakery, cafe and mill, who are passionate about sourdough and the lost traditions of our baking ancestors. Using organic, locally sourced ingredients, they make delicious daily-baked breads and run bread-making courses that give you all the confidence you need to bake at home. During lockdown their courses are online and virtual, but whether virtual or real, they’re excellent, leaving you with a skill you’ll enjoy and the ability to make a loaf or two to feed the family.     

If the course isn’t for you or isn’t practical, there are a host of sourdough recipes online, and many have tutorial videos that guide you through the process. It might look complicated, but really isn’t. I bake a loaf every week, alternating between a white and wholemeal loaf (70% white/30% wholemeal) and a rye loaf (see image of one baked today). Sometimes I make a spelt one. All take time and concentration, involving leavens made one or two days in advance, doughs that require folding every half an hour – up to five times – and overnight proving, but the finished products are truly magnificent and well worth the time and effort. 

I finish with this quote from E5 Bakery. ‘The sour in sourdough is a by-product of the bacteria in the dough. This bacteria create organic acids as they feed on naturally occurring sugars; by controlling the time and temperature the dough is proved at, the baker determines the flavour of the bread. At the right concentration this acidity is delicious and also preserves the freshness of the bread.’  

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

All proceeds go to the INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

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Left or right brain?

 ‘Creative or prefer a jigsaw,’ was a heading that caught my eye in my constant trawl through the internet looking for stuff of interest to help escape complete boredom and shut down.

I’ve known that the brain splits into two halves, left and right, but in the article ‘Left Brain vs. Right Brain: What Does This Mean for Me?’ it quotes we are either left or right brain people.

Left brain

  • Thinking in words
  • Sequencing
  • Linear thinking
  • Mathematics
  • Facts
  • Logic

Right brain

  • Feelings visualisation
  • Imagination
  • Intuition
  • Rhythms
  • Holistic thinking
  • Arts

‘The theory is that people are either left-brained or right-brained, meaning that one side of their brain is dominant. If you’re mostly analytical and methodical in your thinking, you’re said to be left-brained. If you tend to be more creative or artistic, you’re thought to be right-brained,’ so says the article. 

Oh,  so I’m right-brained, I told myself, wanting to be classified as creative, and ticking at least four of the character traits in the right brain list, but then I recognised as many in the left brain list.

Could I be ambi-brained, (derivative of ambidextrous) if there is such a word? I questioned, thinking for a short while, just a few seconds, that I could have the best of both worlds, pulling traits from both parts of my brain to create a truly magnificent work of art, piece of literature, mind-blowing poem, blockbuster movie, maybe all. And then I came down to earth. Further on the article reads:

‘The two hemispheres are tied together by bundles of nerve fibres, creating an information highway. Although the two sides function differently, they work together and complement each other. You don’t use only one side of your brain at a time.’

Coming slowly to terms with not being unique, and being normal, I read on to find ‘tips for keeping your brain sharp,’ and ‘tips for boosting creativity.’

It’s worth reading.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

All proceeds go to the INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

Mailing list 

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Meet Max Langstone

Max, the central character in my next novel, had a tough life until he met Anna. Bullied at school and the victim of a fraud instigated by his best friend that left him almost bankrupt, he felt at twenty-five life was not the great gig people had made out, and he questioned the worth of living.  Luckily, as he started to slide into depression and nearer to taking his life, he was offered the job he had sought as a journalist with a well-respected weekly current affairs journal read by millions throughout the world, giving him the fillip he needed and restoring his sanity.

He met Charlie six months into his time at The World Today. Never having a serious girlfriend before, it was easy for him to fall in love with her. She was pretty, outgoing, and popular and they moved in together after a torrid month of dating. A warm and loving relationship, he thought, until after a year he found she was cheating on him. Twice every week she’d say she was working late, but she wasn’t, she was sleeping with another man. A common lie, he was told by friends, but not a situation he had ever suspected.

Devastated, and fearing his demons might return, he searched online and found Emma. Eager and without hesitation, he struck up a relationship with her. After six weeks they started to live together, and the time Emma started to take control over his life. He could go along with her bedroom and bathroom linen, her cutlery and crockery, her kitchen aides and utensils, but when she started taking down his ornaments, his paintings and pictures, rearranging his books and telling him what to read, eat, and how to dress, he flipped. They had a flaming row and an acrimonious split.

Work became his saving grace. For a year he worked almost every waking hour. He’d jump out of bed, shower, and walk out of his apartment eating his breakfast while checking news’ updates related to his current project. Always first in the office, he’d work until nine or ten most nights, and once home he’d make a snack, check over his day’s work and go to bed. His diligence was noticed and rewarded. Shortly into his second year, he was offered a position as The World Today’s correspondent in Rome; and there he found Anna Bagloni.

They met through work, and to Max’s surprise, his reticence, and not in any way expecting or wanting their meeting to lead to anything further, he found her charm and warm heartedness captivating and infectious. To his surprise when she offered to show him around Rome he accepted and within a couple of months he’d moved in with her. 

A relationship that was meant to be, they both thought. A true partnership, both best friends of the other, and supporting each other in everything they did. Anna only wanted the best for Max and he the same for her. They were truly in love. When Anna asked Max about his parents and he said he had never known his father and his relationship with his mother was not close, he found she’d opened up a part of his life he had kept locked away. He felt good talking about it.

So, at the age of the age of thirty-five Max started living the second part of his life and discovering the parents he had not known.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

All proceeds go to the INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

Mailing list 

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Sprouting green shoots

 A cluster of green shoots, buds on the wisteria, snowdrops pushing through frozen soil. Each year, these and other signs of spring ignite in me a sense of revival, a knowledge that the days are growing longer, and winter will soon be past. This year, like I guess all of us, I’d like to be able to fast forward from now until spring’s eventual arrival. 

With the daily news almost too awful to absorb, it’s difficult to see through the gloom, but as each day passes more people will have been vaccinated against Covid, and for once, our government can take some credit: to date we’ve immunised more people than has been done by the whole of Europe.         

There are many more people to inject with the vaccine, and there’ll be some bumps along the way, obstacles to navigate around, and maybe some delays, but we’ll get there. We have a good history of vaccination in this country. This programme is a challenge, and will test our resources and organisational skills, yet I believe we’ll achieve the target. On a cynical note, the PM and his government have come under so much pressure over their handling of the pandemic, they know they simply cannot fail on this.    

We will come through this crisis, on that I have no doubt, and life will gradually return to normal, be it there will be some restrictions and precautions for a little while yet. Life this time next year will look a hell of a lot better than now. Covid – 19 will still be around in the world, but with the US re-joining the World Health Organisation (WHO) and agreement from world leaders, the WHO can set up and lead a world-wide programme to eradicate Covid entirely. 

Let’s look forward to Spring and better times.

Stay safe.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

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2021 – and reasons to be hopeful

2021 sounds better already. It has an optimistic ring to it. To prove to myself I wasn’t being over hopeful, I Googled ‘reasons to be hopeful in 2021’ and found the list long – several pages of hope. Try it, there’s much to look forward to.

‘2020 has been a difficult year, but there are some glints of light in the gloom. From nature-friendly farms to anti-ageing worms and even a way of conjuring vodka out of thin air, here are a few nuggets of good cheer to look forward to in 2021.’ The Guardian.

A vaccine for HIV has been trialled in sub-Saharan Africa with incredibly exciting results.

Bristol: green energy, cycle paths, green space, allotments, veg boxes and vegan restaurants are plentiful. Buses are powered by human waste and vehicles are excluded from streets so kids can play. 

Vodka made out of thin air: toasting the planet’s good health. The Air Company, based in New York, makes vodka from two ingredients: carbon dioxide taken from the air and water. 

Cleaning up the ocean: ‘Things that seem insoluble can be solved.’ Giant ‘Garbage Patches’ in the worlds’ oceans – each the size of 24 football pitches –  have been pioneered to collect much of the discarded cans and plastic that pollute our seas.

Saved from extinction: the rare species back from the brink.

  • Antarctic blue whales 
  • Kakapo: The kakapo is the world’s heaviest, longest-lived parrot – a flightless, nocturnal creature 
  • Beavers 
  • Great fox spider 
  • Hen harrier

Regenerative farming: a return to nature-friendly agriculture. 

How new ways of farming restore the environment and banish intensive livestock farming in favour of naturally fed animals in free-range environments.

Bringing sight to the blind: developing a new artificial eye. 

Eduardo Fernandez, a neuro-engineer has embedded a port into a blind person’s skull and restored her sight after sixteen years of blindness.

Celebrity philanthropy: when the great are also really good. 

How the actions and financial donations of Dolly Parton, Man Utd’s striker Marcus Rashford, Rihanna, Brad Pitt, and Taylor Swift have set a trend that more celebrities are bound to follow. 

 Anti-ageing: the worms that may help us live longer, healthier lives. 

A scientist’s gene-altering experiment on worms could lead to longer, healthier lives for humans.

More at The Guardian.

Bill Gates’s take on 2021, particularly his positive view on Covid vaccines, is also worth a read. ‘You can decide for yourself, but I think he does a good job of wrapping up positive developments and delivering them in a way that’s hopeful without being Pollyanna-ish.’ (Bill Murphy, Inc.com.)

‘For all the horrors of the year, hope is still present – as the historian Agathias wrote in the sixth century, times of disaster throw up prophets who talk about doom and gloom and predict how much worse things will get with great certainty. Much better, then, to be positive and optimistic.’ The Guardian.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

Mailing list 

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Christmas still sparkles and shines

Fairy lights twinkle, Christmas trees sparkle, mince pies are being baked, and the tiny green shoots of snowdrops begin to poke through the winter soil. Despite the pandemic, it’s late December and Christmas is upon us.  

May your Christmas time be happy, peaceful, and full of joy and love. 

May the vulnerable in the world find safety, shelter, food and water, health and happiness, and freedom from persecution. 

May those who wage hate stop; and realise the world is a better place if we love our neighbour and work together.

We’ve passed the shortest day. Days get longer, bulbs start to appear, and for us all the New Year cannot come sooner, and we put this wretched one behind us. Twenty Twenty-One will be different, there can be no doubt about that. As more and more people are vaccinated, Covid’s ravages will start to decline, and by the second half of 2021 we’ll see a return to some normality. By the end of the year, we may well be witnessing the virus’s real decline and eventual elimination.

The speed at which scientists throughout the world have developed these vaccines is astonishing. Polio took twenty-three years, smallpox eighteen years, whilst no vaccine exists for malaria at the moment, although one is close. All those who’ve been involved in the development of Covid – 19 vaccines must be applauded.

My thanks to all of you who follow and read this blog, again I wish you the very best for Christmas, and a safe, healthy, and happy New Year.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

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Happy Christmas for coral

While coral reefs around the world are dying due to warming waters brought on by the climate crisis, scientists, working off East Africa, have discovered a large area of cool water housing a thriving reef, rich in wildlife and healthy coral. It runs the length of Kenya and Tanzania. 

‘The coral sanctuary is a wildlife hotspot, teeming with spinner dolphins and boasting rare species, including prehistoric fish and dugongs. Researchers believe its location in a cool spot in the ocean is helping to protect it and the surrounding marine life from the harmful effects of the climate crisis.’ The Guardian.

Apparently, the area was formed thousands of years ago by glacial runoffs from Mount Kilimanjaro. 

Although there still is much to do to halt the decline in the world’s coral reefs – home and life resource to a multitude of wildlife – this is a glimmer of hope and something to cheer about.  

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

Mailing list

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Are you ‘woke?’

Apparently, according to Wikipedia, you are labelled woke if you are aware of injustices and inequalities in the world, especially racism. OK, I put my hand up to that, as I do to caring about all unfairness in the world. And I guess most people I know do as well. Not only do I care, I want governments and organisations to act to change these wrongs and evils. Is that wrong? Does that need a special label? Surely not, it’s just basic humanity to care for others not so fortunate as ourselves. So, if that’s being woke, I’m woke, and happy to be so.

On some media platforms, the term woke can be read as derogatory, used to describe people who support Black Lives Matter, LGBT causes, the Me-Too movement, and plain old equality and social justice, and in that it has become political and used by right-wing extremist groups who want to point a finger at those they wish to belittle and diminish. Calling someone woke if they are aware and care is not a big deal; an unnecessary label maybe but not something I’d leave sleep over; using it to berate and be offensive to people standing up for fairness is not OK and needs to be called out.  

I don’t belong to any political party, nor am I right or left-wing, judging issues as they arise on their merit or otherwise. All should be treated with dignity and respect – like you’d want to be treated yourself – embracing an inclusive society where kindness and rationality prevail.

~

 My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

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A huge victory for polar bears

Two polar bears show their joy at the news an appeal court in America has rejected the US government’s proposal to drill for oil in their backyard.

For polar bears life is a worry. Their habitat, the ice cap of the Arctic is melting. Unless the melt is halted, polar bears will have nowhere to live, threatening their existence. A consortium made up of Defenders of Wildlife, Greenpeace, and Pacific Environment brought a lawsuit against the US government’s plans to drill for oil in federal Arctic waters, offering conclusive evidence that the plan would endanger local communities, animals, and the environment. The consortium won, and the plan has been halted before it starts.

This is a victory for the bears, the local community, and the environment. Well done, but the oil companies will be back and need to be fought.

To read the full article, go to White Wolf Pack,  an organisation for the protection of polar bears, wolves, and other threatened species.

To find out more about Greenpeace and donate, click here.

~

 My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

Mailing list

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What a mash up

It was one of those days when we both had much to do and neither had thought about what we were having for supper. It’s a store cupboard/freezer meal, we agreed as we stared at an empty fridge at 6:00pm on a Sunday, knowing we had little chance of finding a shop open. We’d done a big online order on Saturday, for delivery this week, and had forgotten to consider Sunday. I set about to figure something out. 

It didn’t turn out so bad after all. Finding a couple of frozen salmon filets bought when there was an offer on, a few potatoes and a bunch of kale a day or two passed its used by date, I realised I had the ingredients for Nigel Slater’s Salmon Colcannon. Dead easy, delicious, and including the time to boil the potatoes, took no more than half an hour.

Basically; it’s lightly cooked salmon and sautéed kale mixed into mashed potato with plenty of butter, pepper and salt, and maybe an extra dribble of olive oil and a sprinkle of parsley, if you have it, to finish. A bright and cheery dish we’ve had several times, and it never fails to please us. So as long as you’ve got some salmon in the freezer, some potatoes, and any kale like green you can make it. Of course, if you plan in advance to make it, use fresh salmon. Here’s Nigel Slater’s recipe again.

~

My recent publications

Life in four stories 

Four shorts: two about life, love, and death; one a poignant and disturbing memory that dangles a question unanswered; and one a wild fantasy – plus the first chapter of my latest book, Otto and Frankie.

All proceeds go to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help the most vulnerable communities fight COVID – 19.

By buying this book you are helping fund ICRC in its valuable work.

Thank you.

Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

My latest novel, Otto and Frankie, is about a dying man’s fight against injustice, his wife’s unusual affair, and the love from his long-lost daughter. 

Otto and his daughter Frankie could not be more different. He’s rich, an acclaimed author, human rights activist, and lives in England. She lives in New York, just about survives from one pay cheque to the next and hasn’t seen or spoken to her father for twenty years. Dutifully reunited by his impending death, she’s amazed to find him a kind and noble man who, while grappling with his wife’s bizarre affair, champions for the world’s forgotten and dispossessed to his last. After Otto’s death, Frankie’s admiration for her father leads her into a dangerous and life changing pursuit. 

amazon.co.uk. amazon.com.

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